This makes it all worthwhile..

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Email from client..

Hi Ian,

Just a quickie to say thanks so much for todays shoot, it’s always a bit nerve wracking using a new photographer on a client shoot so it was a huge relief that you were so flexible, personable, professional and generally on the case. I’m really looking forward to getting the shots back and look forward to working again in the future.

Thanks again,

Sally.

 

Corporate Portrait

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Tasked with keeping commerce working through the massive influx of people during the 2012 Olympic games in London, property management companies and IT managers were faced with averting connection outages with their wi-fi connection capabilities.

This was a corporate portrait to accompany magazine articles and video interviews for a well known internet provider.

Corporate Portrait

Corporate Portrait

 

 

Posted in Commissioned Work Corporate Photography Magazine / PR Photography Portrait Photography by Ian. Comments Off on Corporate Portrait

NATIONAL GRID Hutton 400k sub station upgrade.

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This was an interesting assignment to show a 165M x 14M high retaining wall constructed in 4 Weeks.

The work was to culvert an existing stream into 1200mm dia concrete pipes and construct a retaining wall using 2 different systems that interface with each other. the wall is 160m long and 14m high. Approx 40,000t of stone was used behind the wall with 68,000m3 of earth moved around site to create a 185m x 85m plateau. Bases are yet to be cast in situ to enable the outage to be met.

Retaining wall construction

Retaining wall construction

 

Retaining wall construction

Retaining wall construction

Retaining wall construction - team shot

Retaining wall construction - team shot

Armistead Wind Farm

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Alternative energy project Armistead Wind farm was an interesting project to shoot with various obstacles to overcome including exclusion zone working, turbine erection only happening in fair weather and some of that fair weather only happening at night.

Much of the construction work of the wind turbines is done off site leading to the final assembly of the large recognisable components being done on site. These, by virtue that the locations are suitable for ‘wind’ farms, suffer from… wind. Windy conditions are not the most sought after element when it comes to swinging rotor blades on the end of a crane jib, for obvious reasons. Having light or reasonable temperature don’t figure either it seems as this shot after midnight illustrates.

Armistead Wind Farm

Armistead Wind Farm

 

The large components are delivered to site by police escort with local residents informed of delivery schedules which are arranged to avoid any peak time travel. Here, a rotor blade is being delivered to site passing through Old Hutton, adjacent to footpath installed by the contractors financed by a social fund – a community benefit fund provided by the windfarm.

Wind turbine blade being transported through Old Hutton

Wind turbine blade being transported through Old Hutton

After preparation of the support pads and installation of the necessary cabling and control equipment, the main structures of the wind turbine are delivered to site and assembled. This takes place at times allowed by weather conditions, hence, there is no 9.00-5.00 working schedule. This often requires working early or late.

Preparing Wind turbine tower section for installation

Preparing Wind turbine tower section for installation

 

Wind turbine tower installation

Wind turbine tower installation

 

Wind turbine tower installation

Wind turbine tower installation

 

Attaching the rotors to the tower and nacelle is a well practised operation. With the promise of good weather the rotors are assembled on the ground and the cranes maneuvered into place. Ropes are fitted to the ends of the rotor blades to assist positioning of the rotors and to assist in supporting the rotors in position whilst securing to the Nacelle is completed. Seeing such a large structure being swung into position by two cranes and two rope teams working in unison is a sight to behold.

 

Attaching wind turbine rotor blade to nacelle

Attaching wind turbine rotor blade to nacelle

Installing wind turbine rotor

Installing wind turbine rotor

Installing wind turbine rotor

Installing wind turbine rotor

Installing wind turbine rotor

Installing wind turbine rotor

After the wind turbines are installed the farm site is tidied up to return the ground works back to a natural environment. Here the groundworks team are maintaining the surface water drainage systems installed.

Maintaining drainage system at wind farm

Maintaining drainage system at wind farm

When all the civil construction, installation works and landscaping works are complete the countryside is returned to a location which can be enjoyed by the public from the public bridal ways and footpath which crosses the site.

Bridal path across wind farm

Bridal path across wind farm

 

Runners enjoying the footpath across a wind farm

Runners enjoying the footpath across a wind farm

 

Wind farm tower, nacelle and rotor blades

Wind farm tower, nacelle and rotor blades

 

 

Hydro Electric Power scheme

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This is one of the images produced for Hydro Electricity Engineering company Gilkes, of their Coniston Hydro scheme in the Lake District. This was part of a calendar shoot where I intended shooting this particular image at night and lighting the scheme incorporating light trails, but access to the site was deemed too dangerous for staff at night so an alternative image was created instead. The light trails – which were previously trialled and successfully achieved to great effect have been reserved for future projects.

Coniston Hydro

Coniston Hydro Electric project